John Stevenson. Popular Disturbances in England, 1700-1870.

Biblioteca / 1970-1979   1990-1999

John Stevenson. Popular Disturbances in England, 1700-1870.

Londres: Longman, 1979. 380 páginas.

2da edición, Popular Disturbances in England, 1700-1832, London: Longman, 1992. 350 páginas.

CONTENTS

[Edición de 1979]

Preface

1 – Introduction

2 – The age of riots

3 – Manifold disorders

4 – Eighteenth-century London

5 – Food riots in England

6 – Labour disputes before the Combination Laws

7 – The age of revolution

8 – London in the age of revolution

9 – London and the kingdom

10 – The reform struggle

11 – Unions and labourers: industrial and agricultural protest

12 – The Chartist era

13 – The transition to order

14 – Conclusion

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CONTENTS

[Edición de 1992]

Preface to the first edition

Preface to the second edition

1 – Introduction

Disturbances, riots, crowds and mobs

Sources and methods

2 – The age of riots

The ‘rage of party’

The age of oligarchy

Religious riots

3 – Manifold disorders

Recruiting riots

Enclosures and turnpikes

Smugglers, wreckers and poachers

Popular disturbances and the local community

4 – Eighteenth-century London

The Sacheverell riots and popular Toryism in London

The age if Walpole

‘Independent’ Westminster

‘Wilkes and liberty!’

The Gordon Riots

5 – Food riots in England

The location of food disturbances

The participants

Types of food riot

The causes of food riots: prices and disturbances

Riots and near-riots

Famine or scarcity?

The decline of food rioting

6 – Labour disputes before the Combination Laws

The cloth-workers

The framework knitters

The keelmen

Seamen’s strikes

The colliers

The shipbuilding trades

The 1790s

The role of violence

7 – The age of revolution

Church and King riots

Popular radicalism and popular disorder

Industrial disputes under the Combination Laws

The Luddites

8 – London in the age of revolution

The Westminster elections

The impact of the French Revolution

The anti-crimp-house riots

The LCS and opposition to the war

Bread or blood!

Despard and the insurrectionary tradition

9 – London and the kingdom

Burdett and liberty

The passing of the Corn Laws

The insurrectionary tradition: from Spa Fields to Cato Street

The Queen Caroline Affair

10 – Unions and labourers: industrial and agricultural protest

The rise of the unions

Captain Swing

11 – The reform struggle

Waterloo to Peterloo

Peterloo and after

The reform crisis

12 – Conclusion

The causes

Frequency and distribution

Motives and beliefs

The changing face of protest

The threat of revolution

Maps

Map 1. London in the reign of George I

Map 2. London c. 1815

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