Patricia Hollis (ed.) Class and Conflict in Nineteenth-Century England: 1815-1850.

Biblioteca / 1970-1979

Patricia Hollis, ed. Class and Conflict in Nineteenth-Century England, 1815-1850.

Londres: Routledge, 1973.

400 páginas.

Contents

Chronological table

Introduction

One — Class and conflict—the analysis

1 – Old Corruption and the attack on privilege

1a – T. Paine: hereditary government, 1790, 1791

1b – P. Colquhoun: producers and parasites, 1814

1c – Crisis: producers and parasites illustrated, 1834

1d – W. Cobbett: taxation and working men, 1816

1e – Gorgon: the structure of Old Corruption, 1818

1f – R. M. Martin: the burden oftaxation, 1834

1g – Operative: Old Corruption or capitalism? 1838

1h – Chartist Circular, Northern Star: times to try men’s souls, 1840

2 – Old Corruption—the attack on priestcraft

2a – R. Carlile: The tyranny ofthe mind, 1819, 1822

2b – R. Carlile: Kingcraft, priestcraft, lordcraft, 1831

2c – H. Hetherington’s testament of a secularist, 1849

3 – The theft of land—the attack on property

3a – T. Spence: the land, the people’s farm, 1775

3b – A. Davenport: the parish commonwealth, 1822

3c – A. Davenport: monopoly in land, 1824

3d – Man: pledges for reform, 1833

3e – B. O’Brien: land and currency reform, 1847

4 – Competition—the attack on poverty

4a – T. Malthus: population and poverty, 1830

4b – R. Owen: unemployment and the world of plenty, 1820

4c – The Economist: the virtues of Owenism, 1821

4d – Black Dwarf: the morality of Owenism, 1817

4e – Poor Man’s Guardian: Owcnism and politics, 1832

5 – Capitalism—the attack on political economy

5a – J. R. McCullough: classical political economy, 1825

5b – H. Martineau: political economy popularized, 1832

5c – T. Hodgskin: the capitalists’ monopoly of the produce of labour, 1825

5d – W. Thompson: equality of distribution, 1824

5e – G. P. Scrope: the fallacies of socialism, 1833

5f – J. Wade: labour for sale, 1834

5g – Trades Newspaper: masters and men, 1825

5h – J. Scott’s evidence: labour and capital contrasted, 1835

6 – Capitalism—the attack on exploitation

6a – Poor Man’s Guardian: on wages, 1832

6b – Cooperator, Pioneer: exploitation, 1829, 1834

6c – Blackwood’s: free trade and the public good, 1830

6d – Penny Magazine, Poor Mans Guardian: the weaver’s song, 1832

6e – Pioneer: a warning, 1833

6f – E. Jones: exploitation and surplus value, 1851

6g – E. Jones: the song of the low, 1852

7 – Capitalism—the analysis of under-consumption

7a – Trades Newspaper: the freedom of the weaver, 1826

7b – Northern Star, Henry Mayhew: the economy of sweating, 1846, 1861-2

7c – Advocate: the Moloch of machinery, 1833

7d – C. Knight, W. Cooke Taylor, A. Ure: a defence of machinery, 1831, 1842, 1835

7e – Trades Newspaper: foreign trade and foreign benefits, 1825

7f – Poor Man’s Guardian: machinery and consumption, 1835

7g – Companion, Poor Man’s Guardian: under-consumption or over-production? 1833

7h – W. Carpenter: machinery and mass misery, 1831

7i – R. Oastler’s evidence: the demand for a regulated wage, 1834

7j – F. O’Connor: producers and consumers, 1841, 1848

8 – Politics and economics

8a – B. O’Brien: property, 1834, 1838

8b – Poor Man’s Guardian: a last warning on the accursed Reform Bill, 1832

8c – W. Carpenter: the Reform Bill, 1831

9 – The language of class

9a – F. Place, Pioneer: the people, 1832, 1834

9b – Poor Man’s Guardian: class and politics, 1831, 1833

9c – G. J. Holyoake: the chimera of class conciliation, 1842

9d – E. Jones: the boundaries of class, 1851

9e – K. Marx: the definition of class, 1851

9f – Red Republican: three generations of radical language, 1850

Two — Class and conflict—action

1 Peace and Peterloo

1a – Major Cartwright’s Flampden clubs, 1826 on 1812 and 1813

1b – S. Bamford: the early reform movement, 1841 on 1815-17

1c – Cobbett on the impact of Cobbett, 1817

1d – S. Bamford: provocation and suppression, 1841 on 1817

1e – Black Dwarf: the Political Protestants, 1818

1f – Peterloo, 1819 99

2 – Combinations and Combination Acts, 1815-25

2a – Home Office informers: the politicization of distress, 1818

2b – Home Office informers: general union, 1818

2c – The Select Committee on the working of the Combination Acts, 1824

2d – The Report of the Select Committee, 1824

2e – Place’s prophecy, 1825

3 – Rural unrest

3a – W. Cobbett: the destruction of the rural economy, 1825

3b – Home Office informers: Swing: in Norfolk, 1830

3c – W. Cobbett: the rural war, 1830

3d – Joseph Arch: village discipline, 1830s and 1840s

4 – Political unionism

4a – The Birmingham Political Union, 1830

4b – F. Place, Penny Papers: the National Union of the Working Classes, 1831

4c – Bristol Job Nott: another version of the NUWC, 1833, 1831

4d – F. Place: the National Political Union, 1831

4e – The NUWC on the NPU, 1831

4f – Poor Man’s Guardian: the need for separate working-class unions, 1832

4g – F. Place: the middle-class radical platform, 1832

4h – Cold Bath Fields—a statement of grievances, 1833

4i – Address of the London Working Men’s Association, 1876 on 1836

4j – W. Lovett: the LWMA demands reform, 1837

5 – The freedom oj the press

5a – Medusa, Gorgon: the Six Acts, 1820, 1822

5b – Republican: supporters of a free press, 1822

5c – Poor Mans Guardian: the Unstamped press, 1831, 1833

5d – Hetherington’s blasphemy, 1840

6 – Parish radicalism

6a – The Vestries Act and the Reform Act, 1839

6b – The great procession, 1831

6c – The NUWC: assessed taxes, a cause for class co-operation?

7 – Co-operation, 1820-33

7a – The Economist: co-operation at Spa Fields, 1821

7b – W. Lovett, Cooperator: the early co-operative movement, 1876 on 1828, 1830

7c – Crisis, Poor Man’s Guardian: mutual exchange, 1832, 1834

7d – Crisis: stores and societies, 1832

7e – Crisis: the impact of Owen, 1832

8 – Trades unionism, 1825-40: the wage question

8a – Trades Newspaper: the need for union, 1825

8b – United Trades Co-operative Journal: Doherty and general union, 1830

8c – W. Benbow’s Grand National Holiday, 1832

8d – Pioneer: the Operative Builders’ Union, 1833

8e – Pioneer’s argument for syndicalism, 1833, 1834

8f – Pioneer: the Derby turn-out, 1833

8g – Blackwood’s, E. Tufnell: from the other side, 1834

8h – Pioneer: the founding of the GNCTU: resolutions of a conference held in London, 13-19 February 1834

8i – The tailors’ strike: the demand for equalization, 1834

8j – G. Loveless, a Tolpuddle ‘Martyr’, 1838

8k – Evidence to the Select Committee: unions and intimidation—Glasgow cotton spinners, 1838

8l – Commissioners’ comments on masters and men in Norwich, 1838

8m – Doherty’s evidence: defence and desperation, 1838

8n – F. Engels: the implications of unionism, 1844

9 – The Short Time movement: the question of hours

9a – Trades Newspaper: adults for children, 1825

9b – R. Oastler: Yorkshire slavery, 1830

9c – Destructive: the factory girl, 1833

9d – Herald, W. Cobbett: committee, commission and legislation, 1834

9e – J. Fielden: child and adult labour, 1836

9f – Herald: the National Regeneration Society, 1834

9g – A. Ure, W. Cooke Taylor: the charms of child labour, 1835, 1842

9h – Poulett Thomson: the evils of protection—labour and the Factories Regulation Bill, 1836

9i – R. Oastler defending the law, 1836

9j – Northern Star: cheap humanity, 1845

9k – Northern Star: the politics of Short Time, 1846

10 – The new Poor Law, 1834

10a – Report: paupers or labourers? 1834

10b – J. R. Stephens demanding repeal, 1838, 1839

10c – General Sir Charles Napier, Northern Star: misery and relief, 1857 on 1840, 1842

10d – R. Oastler: the rights of the poor undermined, 1841

10c – Northern Star: wages and the Poor Law, 1845

11 – Chartism

11a – Chartism: the middle-class interpretation, 1849, 1839

11b – Chartism: the working-class view, 1839, 1846, 1887

11c – The 1842 petition

12 – Protest Chartism

12a – R. Lowery, T. Cooper: distress and desperation, 1856, 1872

12b – Charter: ulterior measures, 1839

12c – Northern Star: a meeting on ulterior measures, 1839

12d – C. Napier, T. Devyr: pikes and guns, 1839

12e – C. Napier: physical force, 1839, 1843

12f – R. Lowery, Charter: the general strike, 1856 on 1839, 1839

12g – Northern Star: the national holiday, 1840

12h – Charter: the Newport rising, 1839

12i – Northern Star: plans for a general rising, 1840

13 – Self-help Chartism

13a – Northern Star: the National Charter Association, 1840

13b – Northern Star, R. Lowery: the move into popular politics, 1841, 1857 on 1841

13c – Northern Star: municipal Chartism, 1842

13d – B. Wilson: popular politics and exclusive dealing, 1887 on 1846

13e – Nonconformist: let us join the oppressed, 1841

13f – Chartist Circular, Northern Star, R. Lowery: Christian Chartism, 1840, 1841, 1856

13g – Northern Star, Chartist Circular: teetotal Chartism, 1840

13h – Chartist Circular: Chartist schools, 1840

13i – W. Lovett, F. O’Connor: knowledge Chartism and the new move, 1841

13j – F. O’Connor’s verdict on all these new moves, 1841, 1852

13k – Self-control and social control—S. Bamford’s plea, 1841

14 – Chartism and the middle-class alliance

14a – B. O’Brien: the propriety of a middle-class alliance, 1841

14b – B. O’Brien: the middle-class union, 1841

14c – Nonconformist: the suffrage question, 1841

14d – Northern Star etc.: the Complete Suffrage Union, 1842, 1872 on 1842

14c – R. Lowery, W. Cooke Taylor, Northern Star: Chartism and the Anti-Corn Law League, 1857, 1840, 1842

14f – F. Engels: Chartism and the bourgeoisie, 1844

14g – B. O’Brien: The middle-class alliance, 1842

15 – Chartism and trades unionism

15a – Charter, Northern Star: the involvement in politics, 1842

15b – T. Cooper on the Plug Plots, 1872 on 1842

15c – The declarations, 1842

15d – Lord Abinger on Chartism: a conspiracy, 1842

15e – Richard Pilling’s defence, 1843

15f – Midland Mining Commission: miners and magistrates, 1843

15g – Northern Star: Chartism and the trades, 1845

15h – Northern Star: the theory and tactics of unionism, 1845

16 – The Land Plan

16a – Northern Star: the Land Plan as presented to the Chartist Annual Conference of April, 1845

16b – Evidence to the Select Committee on free trade and the Land Plan, 1848

17 – 1848

17a – The National Convention on ulterior measures

17b – R. Gammage: military preparations, 1894 on 1848

17c – Hector Berlioz’s comment, 1848

18 – Co-operation and trading

18a – G. J. Holyoake: Rochdale pioneers, 1857 on 1844

18b – Meliora: co-operative societies in 1860

Three — Class and conflict-conciliation

1 – Philanthropy

1a – Shaftesbury on restlessness and responsibility, 1840

1b – P. Colquhoun: poverty and pauperism, 1814

1c – W. Allen: the social utility of philanthropy, 1812

1d – T. Chalmers: pauperism relieved by the poor, 1850 on 1819

1e – J. Kay: charity, the chain of sympathy, 1862

1f – H. Martineau: the folly of philanthropy, 1832

1g – Figaro: the other view of charity, 1832

2 – Education

2a – D. Giddies, P. Colquhoun: the consequence of education, 1807, 1806

2b – C. Knight, Rev. J. Dufton: the economy of education, 1832, 1847, 1854

2c – Blackwood’s: the myth of useful knowledge, 1834

2d – Working-class comment: education as manipulation, 1823, 1834, 1884, 1852

2e – An inspector’s report, 1841

2f – The inspector and the clergyman: education and social structure, 1859

3 – Religion

3a – Archdeacon Lyall, W. Cooke Taylor, Rev. Oakley, Rev. Sinclair, A. Ure: faith and tranquility, 1833, 1842, 1840, 1849, 1835

3b – A. Ure, R. Lowery: faith and self-discipline, 1822, 1835, 1856

3c – Chartist Circular, Northern Star: anti-clericalism, 1839, 1840

3d – R. Lowery, religion and social responsibility, 1856

3e – C. Kingsley, F. D. Maurice: Christian socialism, 1848, 1851

4 – Politics or paternalism?

4a – The Little Charter, 1848

4b – T. Frost: the Parliamentary Reform Association, 1880 on 1849

4c – R. Cobden: freehold land society, 1849

4d – Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s: in loco parentis, 1832, 1848

4e – R. Lowery: the assumption of responsibility, 1856

4f – Edinburgh Review: the new philanthropists, 1845

4g – J. S. Mill: the poor and their position—two conflicting accounts, 1848

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